Zuckerberg Shares Facebook’s Plan to Bring Community Together, Edits Out a Questionable Sentence Minutes Later

Facebook CEO and founder Mark Zuckerberg wants to bring people closer together. He published a 6,000-word letter on his Facebook page Thursday to outline his vision for the kind of world he thinks Facebook can help create. The free-wielding note included few specifics, but offered a number of broad, ambitious goals for how the tech giant can contribute to a better understanding of everything from terrorism to fake news. Interestingly, minutes after the post was published, Zuckerberg edited out a sentence from the letter. Mashable adds: In the post, Zuckerberg briefly touches on how artificial intelligence can be used to detect terrorist propaganda. “Right now, we’re starting to explore ways to use AI to tell the difference between news stories about terrorism and actual terrorist propaganda so we can quickly remove anyone trying to use our services to recruit for a terrorist organization,” he wrote in the post published Thursday. That sounds like a straightforward enough application of AI — one that’s in line with what Zuckerberg and other executives have discussed in the past — but it’s different from what the CEO had originally written. In an earlier version of the missive, which was shared with a number of news outlets in advance of its publication on Facebook, Zuckerberg took the idea farther. The “long-term promise of AI,” he wrote, is that it can be used used to “identify risks that nobody would have flagged at all, including terrorists planning attacks using private channels.” Here’s an expanded version of the quote from the Associated Press (emphasis ours). “The long term promise of AI is that in addition to identifying risks more quickly and accurately than would have already happened, it may also identify risks that nobody would have flagged at all â” including terrorists planning attacks using private channels, people bullying someone too afraid to report it themselves, and other issues both local and global. It will take many years to develop these systems.” That’s different from what was described in the final version that was shared Thursday, which made no mention of private communication in relation to AI and terrorism.


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