With No Fair Use, It’s More Difficult to Innovate, Says Google

Unlike the United States where ‘fair use’ exemptions are entrenched in law, Australia has only a limited “fair dealing” arrangement. This led head of copyright at Google to conclude that Australia wouldn’t be a safe place for his company to store certain data, a clear hindrance to innovation and productivity. From a report on TorrentFreak: The legal freedom offered by fair use is a cornerstone of criticism, research, teaching and news reporting, one that enables the activities of thousands of good causes and enriches the minds of millions. However, not all countries fully embrace the concept. Perhaps surprisingly, Australia is currently behind the times on this front, a point not lost on Google’s Senior Copyright Counsel, William Patry. Speaking with The Australian, Patry describes local copyright law as both arcane and not fit for purpose, while acting as a hindrance to innovation and productivity. “We think Australians are just as innovative as Americans, but the laws are different. And those laws dictate that commercially we act in a different way,” Patry told the publication. “Our search function, which is the basis of the entire company, is authorized in the US by fair use. You don’t have anything like that here.” Australia currently employs a more restrictive “fair dealing” approach, but itâ(TM)s certainly possible that fair use could be introduced in the near future.


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