Wikipedia’s ‘Ban’ of ‘The Daily Mail’ Didn’t Really Happen

Earlier this year, The Guardian reported that editors at Wikipedia had “voted to ban the Daily Mail as a source for the website,” calling the publication “generally unreliable.” Two months later, not only previous Daily Mail citations on Wikipedia pages are still alive, several new ones have also appeared since. So what’s going on? The Outline has the story: There are no rules on Wikipedia, just guidelines. Of Wikipedia’s five “pillars,” the fifth is that there are no firm rules. There is no formal hierarchy either, though the most dedicated volunteers can apply to become administrators with extra powers after being approved by existing admins. But even they don’t say what goes on the site. If there’s a dispute or a debate, editors post a “request for comment,” asking whoever is interested to have their say. The various points are tallied up by an editor and co-signed by four more after a month, but it’s not a vote as in a democracy. Instead, the aim is to reach consensus of opinion, and if that’s not possible, to weigh the arguments and pick the side that’s most compelling. There was no vote to ban the Daily Mail because Wikipedia editors don’t vote. (emphasis ours.) So what happened? The article adds: In this case, an editor submitted a broader request for comment about its [the Daily Mail’s] general reliability. Seventy-seven editors participated in the discussion and two thirds supported prohibiting the Daily Mail as a source, with one editor and four co-signing editors (more than usual) chosen among administrators declaring that a consensus, though further discussion continued on a separate noticeboard, alongside complaints that the debate should have been better advertised. Though it’s discouraged, the Daily Mail can be (and still is) cited. An editor I met at a recent London “Wikimeet” said he’d used the Daily Mail as a source in the last week, as it was the only source available for the subject he was writing about.


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