≡ Menu

User Expresses Privacy Concerns After Software Update Replaces Default Phone App

An anonymous reader writes: Since I am not living in my home country, I frequently use two different SIM cards and prefer having a phone with dual-sim support. This limits your choice significantly when buying a new device and last time I bought one, I opted for the Wileyfox Swift. It was cheap, had most features I desired and shipped with CyanogenMod (Android) — which, I thought, might indicate that Wileyfox delivers a slim, privacy-aware system. Yesterday, I was delighted to see that Wileyfox provides an update to a new version of Android (7.1.1) and I didn’t hesitate long to install the upgrade. Concerns that the hardware might not hold-up to the new system showed to be unfounded and everything seemed to work just fine. But when I realised that the dialler now labelled itself as ‘truecaller’ — something I had never heard of, shoot, I didn’t even know the dialler is an app — it gave rise to a bad suspicion: Is some of my phone’s core functionality now provided by a 3rd-party app? Indeed. Does it respect my privacy? No. Can I uninstall it again? No. Was I ever asked to comply with their terms and conditions? Of course not. On top of this, Truecaller doesn’t seem to have a clean background. Here’s how an Indian daily (Truecaller seems to be popular in emerging regions) described the app: Truecaller is a popular app that shows you contact details of unknown numbers calling you. It crowdsources contact details from all its users’ address books. So even if you’ve never used the service, your name and number could be on Truecaller’s database, thanks to someone else who’s saved your contact details and allowed the app to access them.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

{ 0 comments… add one }

Leave a Comment

Home | About | Contact | Disclaimer | Terms | Privacy

Copyright © 2017 by Tom Connelly | All Rights Reserved

Next post:

Previous post: