University Collects Medical Samples Via Drones In Madagascar

An anonymous reader quotes a report from Phys.Org: Stony Brook University is using drones to transport medical samples for laboratory analysis to and from remote parts of Madagascar. Phys.Org reports: “The drones are about the size of a large picnic table and have two sets of wings. They take off and land like helicopters and have a flight range of about 40 miles. Blood and other medical samples can be secured in small compartments in the body of the aircraft. Drones are being used in other parts of the developing world to deliver medications and other supplies to remote areas, but Stony Brook officials say theirs is one of the first efforts involving a small unmanned aircraft that actually lands in remote villages and returns quickly to a laboratory. Diagnosis of ailments, like tapeworm disease, which causes life-threatening seizures and contributes to malnutrition in villages on the island, can now be completed within a few hours, said Dr. Peter Small, founding director of Stony Brook’s Global Health Institute. To reach these villages, medical workers have had to travel on foot — there are no roads — a trip that takes five to nine hours each way. By drone, they can dispatch the medical samples back to Stony Brook’s Centre ValBio research station and get lab results within an hour or two, said Patricia Wright, the station’s executive director.”


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