Uber Face Fines Over Drunk Driving Complaints — And Lost $2.8 Billion Last Year

While Uber’s bookings doubled last year, the company still showed a net lost of $2.8 billion. And now, “California regulators are recommending that Uber pay a $1.13 million fine for not investigating rider complaints that drivers were working intoxicated.” An anonymous reader writes:
California “requires ride-hailing companies to have a zero-tolerance policy for driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs,” notes Reuters — and yet Tuesday’s order reports that investigators “found no evidence that (Uber) followed up in any way with zero-tolerance complaints several hours or even one full day after passengers filed such complaints.” Investigators from the state’s Public Utilities Commission are asking the full commission to examine their findings,

“To confirm the policy, regulators analyzed selected complaints against drivers who received three or more complaints,” Reuters reports. Though Uber has sometimes suspended drivers within one hour of customer complaints — 22 times — they’ve apparently received 2,047 drug- or alcohol-related complaints between August 2014 and August of 2015. “The company said drivers were banned from working in 574 of those complaints, according to the order. But regulators then reviewed 154 complaints, and determined that the company failed to promptly suspend drivers in 149 complaints. The company also failed to investigate 133 complaints, and did not suspend a driver or investigate 113 complaints, the order shows… In at least 25 instances, Uber failed to suspend or investigate a driver after three or more complaints, the order states.”
An Uber spokeswoman said the company had no comment, but “Adding to Uber’s challenges, a Reuters investigation found a ten-fold increase in attacks on drivers in Sao Paulo last year, including several murders, after the start of cash payments on its platform at the end of July.” And in addition, a judge in Brazil ruled last week that Uber’s drivers are employees, which could make Uber liable for a variety of benefits, following a similar ruling in another Brazilian state court.

But there’s also some good news for Uber. A court in Rome suspended a ban on Uber in Italy until the company finishes its legal appeal, and a two-month suspension in Taiwan also came to an end after Uber agreed to partner with license rental car companies.


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