Three Privacy Groups Challenge The FBI’s Malware-Obtained Evidence

In 2015 the FBI took over a Tor-accessible child pornography site to infect its users with malware so they could be identified and prosecuted. But now one suspect is challenging that evidence in court, with three different privacy groups filing briefs in his support.

An anonymous reader writes.
One EFF attorney argues it’s a classic case of an unreasonable search, which is prohibited by the U.S. Constitution. “If the FBI tried to get a single warrant to search 8,000 houses, such a request would unquestionably be denied.” But there’s another problem, since the FBI infected users in 120 different countries. “According to Privacy International, the case also raises important questions: What if a foreign country had carried out a similar hacking operation that affected U.S. citizens?” writes Computerworld. “Would the U.S. welcome this…? The U.S. was overstepping its bounds by conducting an investigation outside its borders without the consent of affected countries, the group said.”

The FBI’s evidence is also being challenged by the ACLU of Massachusetts, and the EFF plans to file two more challenges in March, warning that otherwise “the precedent is likely to impact the digital privacy rights of all Internet users for years to come… Courts need to send a very clear message that vague search warrants that lack the required specifics about who and what is to be searched wonâ(TM)t be upheld.”


Share on Google+

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Clip to Evernote

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *