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The US May Finally See Widespread ‘Super Wi-Fi’ Deployment

The end of the FCC’s spectrum auction last week “should give a clear indication of how much space will be available in each TV market for Super Wi-Fi,” according to the Bay Area Newsgroup. An anonymous reader quotes their report:
[T]he technology has promised speedy internet for rural citizens and to help urban dwellers get connected in buildings and rooms that are now twilight zones for Wi-Fi signals… And because the spectrum is regulated and largely reserved for television signals, Super Wi-Fi transmissions don’t have to contend with interference from random devices like microwaves or cordless phones, as do signals in other wireless bands. Super Wi-Fi signals generally won’t be as fast as regular Wi-Fi signals, but for many customers, they’ll be faster and provide better service than what they’d get otherwise…
It’s widely expected that there will be plenty of room for Super Wi-Fi in rural areas where there are few television signals, which is why companies like Cal.net and Q-Wireless have pressed forward with the technology even before the auction closes. The big question is whether regulators will preserve sufficient space for Super Wi-Fi in areas like New York and Los Angeles where there are lots of broadcast stations and in cities like Detroit and San Diego that have to share the airwaves with cities from other countries. If there’s not enough space in those areas, Super Wi-Fi, in this country at least, will likely be relegated to rural areas.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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