The Quirky Habits of Certified Science Geniuses

dryriver shares a report from the BBC: Celebrated inventor and physicist Nikola Tesla swore by toe exercises — every night, he’d repeatedly “squish” his toes, 100 times for each foot, according to the author Marc J Seifer. While it’s not entirely clear exactly what that exercise involved, Tesla claimed it helped to stimulate his brain cells. The most prolific mathematician of the 20th Century, Paul Erdos, preferred a different kind of stimulant: amphetamine, which he used to fuel 20-hour number benders. When a friend bet him $500 that he couldn’t stop for a month, he won but complained “You’ve set mathematics back a month.” Newton, meanwhile, bragged about the benefits of celibacy. When he died in 1727, he had transformed our understanding of the natural world forever and left behind 10 million words of notes; he was also, by all accounts, still a virgin (Tesla was also celibate, though he later claimed he fell in love with a pigeon). It’s common knowledge that sleep is good for your brain — and Einstein took this advice more seriously than most. He reportedly slept for at least 10 hours per day — nearly one and a half times as much as the average American today (6.8 hours). But can you really slumber your way to a sharper mind? Many of the world’s most brilliant scientific minds were also fantastically weird. From Pythagoras’ outright ban on beans to Benjamin Franklin’s naked “air baths,” the path to greatness is paved with some truly peculiar habits.


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