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The Petya Ransomware Is Starting To Look Like a Cyberattack in Disguise

Further research and investigation into Petya ransomware — which has affected computers in over 60 countries — suggest three interesting things: 1. Ukraine was the epicentre of the attack. According to Kaspersky, 60 percent of all machines infected were located within Ukraine. 2. The attackers behind the attack have made little money — around $10,000. Which leads to speculation that perhaps money wasn’t a motive at all. 3. Petya was either “incredibly buggy, or irreversibly destructive on purpose.” An anonymous reader shares a report: Because the virus has proven unusually destructive in Ukraine, a number of researchers have come to suspect more sinister motives at work. Peeling apart the program’s decryption failure in a post today, Comae’s Matthieu Suiche concluded a nation state attack was the only plausible explanation. “Pretending to be a ransomware while being in fact a nation state attack,” Suiche wrote, “is in our opinion a very subtle way from the attacker to control the narrative of the attack.” Another prominent infosec figure put it more bluntly: “There’s no fucking way this was criminals.” There’s already mounting evidence that Petya’s focus on Ukraine was deliberate. The Petya virus is very good at moving within networks, but initial attacks were limited to just a few specific infections, all of which seem to have been targeted at Ukraine. The highest-profile one was a Ukrainian accounting program called MeDoc, which sent out a suspicious software update Tuesday morning that many researchers blame for the initial Petya infections. Attackers also planted malware on the homepage of a prominent Ukraine-based news outlet, according to one researcher at Kaspersky.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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