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Rotten Tomatoes Scores Don’t Correlate To Box Office Success or Woes, Research Shows

Depending on who you ask, Rotten Tomatoes is the reason some movies don’t perform at the box office. From a report: Countless movie executives, including producers, have told Deadline and the New York Times that the number atop a movie’s page on Rotten Tomatoes signifying whether the majority of critics enjoyed or disliked a movie rules the box office. Director Brett Ratner was quoted as saying “I think it’s the destruction of our business” while others have called for its demise. According to research conducted by Yves Bergquist, director of the Data & Analytics Project at USC’s Entertainment Technology Center, that’s not correct. Bergquist collected data from 150 movies this year that made more than $1 million at the box office. Using those Box Office Mojo numbers and comparing them to the critic and audience score on Rotten Tomatoes, Bergquist then “looked at [the] correlation between scores and financial performance” to determine if there was a linear line that could be drawn between low scores and bad box office performance. Or, more simply, did a lower “rotten” rating on Rotten Tomatoes equate to box office woes? The short answer is no, it didn’t. Bergquist’s findings confirmed that of the 150 movies surveyed, there was only a 12 percent correlation between a movie receiving a bad score and not performing well at the box office. Summer films saw even less of a correlation, with seven percent of lower-scored movies not performing at the box office.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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