Pixels Are Driving Out Reality

An article on Motherboard today investigates the reasons why people didn’t go “oh-my-god, that was awesome” looking at the CGI-based scenes in the recent movies such as Independence Day: Resurgence, Batman v Superman and X-Men: Apocalypse. Though the article acknowledges that this could be the result of some poor-acting, spotty storyline, or bad editing, it also underscores the possibility that this could be the aftermath of a “deeper mechanism that is draining all substance from our cinematic imaginary worlds?” The author of the article, Riccardo Manzotti to make his case stronger adds that the original Alien movie was able to impress us because what we saw was strongly linked to actual life. From the article: The humongous spaceship Nostromo — a miniature model — provoked awe and respect. When the creature erupted from Kane’s abdomen — a plaster model encased in fake blood and animal entrails — people were horrified. The shock was registered on the faces of the actors, who, per Ridley Scott’s direction, weren’t told ahead of time that the moment would include a giant splatter of blood. “That’s why their looks of disgust and horror are so real,” producer and co-writer David Giler said. Manzotti further argues that some of the modern movies haven’t left us awe-inspired because there is just too much CGI content. Compared to 430 computerized shots in the original Independence Day movie, for instance, the new one has 1,750 digitized shots. “People have been looking at pixels for much too long,” the author argues, adding: Our imaginary world has been diluted and diluted to the point that, so to speak, there is no longer even a stain of real blood, love, and pain. Nowadays, when spectators see blood, they see pixels. […] VR and augmented reality and the steady pace of CGI have pushed the process of substitution of reality to a higher level. At least, movies were once made using real stunts and real objects. Now, the actual world is no longer needed. The actual world, which is the good money, is no longer required. The virtual world, the bad money, is taking over. Yet, it lacks substance. The author makes several more compelling arguments, that are worth mulling.


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