Over 14K ‘Let’s Encrypt’ SSL Certificates Issued To PayPal Phishing Sites

BleepingComputer reports:
During the past year, Let’s Encrypt has issued a total of 15,270 SSL certificates that contained the word ‘PayPal’ in the domain name or the certificate identity. Of these, approximately 14,766 (96.7%) were issued for domains that hosted phishing sites, according to an analysis carried out on a small sample of 1,000 domains, by Vincent Lynch, encryption expert for The SSL Store… Lynch, who points out the abuse of Let’s Encrypt’s infrastructure, doesn’t blame the Certificate Authority (CA), but nevertheless, points out that other CAs have issued a combined number of 461 SSL certificates containing the term “PayPal” in the certificate information, which were later used for phishing attacks… Phishers don’t target these CAs because they’re commercial services, but also because they know these organizations will refuse to issue certificates for certain hot terms, like “PayPal,” for example. Back in 2015, Let’s Encrypt made it clear in a blog post it doesn’t intend to become the Internet’s HTTPS watchdog.
Of course, some web browsers don’t even check whether a certificate has been revoked. An anonymous reader writes:

Browser makers are also to blame, along with “security experts” who tell people HTTPS is “secure,” when they should point out HTTPS means “encrypted communication channel,” and not necessarily that the destination website is secure.


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