Nolan’s Cinematic Vision in ‘Dunkirk’ is Hollywood’s Best Defense Against Netflix

There’s nothing quite like filming a movie on film, according to the director Christopher Nolan. His new WWII film, Dunkirk, was shot entirely on epic 65mm, as opposed to digital. And it’s receiving the widest release of that film format in recent history. But Nolan’s views on doing things the way “they’re meant to be done,” isn’t limited to just making a film. He also wants you watch the movie in the theatre, and not on streaming service Netflix, which he says he rarely uses. From a report: “Dunkirk,” director Christopher Nolan’s big budget war epic, is a filmmaker’s film and a movie buff’s dream with its wide, high-resolution 70mm format. It’s like an expressionist painting, said ComScore media analyst Paul Dergarabedian. The Hollywood Reporter even said “Dunkirk” could launch a 70mm film renaissance. “I would always prefer and really recommend that everyone see it on Imax 70mm,” Dergarabedian said. “People talk about ‘they don’t make movies like that anymore.’ Well, this is that movie.” Dunkirk, which opens across the U.S. this weekend, is a film that everyone will tell you has to be seen on the big screen. And that has rekindled the debate about the pros and cons of films opening in a theater versus being streamed by Netflix. In an interview with Indiewire ahead of the film’s premiere, Nolan criticized Netflix for its “bizarre aversion to supporting theatrical films.” Netflix, despite doubling down on its film business and looking to make inroads in the industry, has continued its controversial stance against Hollywood’s theatrical window model. To the film industry’s dismay, Netflix is still adopting a day and date release model — dropping a movie on the streaming service the same day it hits theaters. Hollywood relies on the money moviegoers spend at the box office, and the industry is reluctant to give up the exclusive window of time that films are only in theaters, fearing it would cripple that income stream. “Dunkirk” is an impressive $150 million argument on behalf of cinema.


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