New Crowdfunding Campaign Offers Modular EOMA68 Computing Devices

A new crowdfunding campaign by Rhombus Tech “introduces the world’s first devices built around the EOMA68 standard,” which separates a “modular” CPU board from the rest of the system so that it can be easily used in multiple devices and upgraded more simply. Rhombus Tech is now offering a 15.6-inch laptop, a laser-cut wooden Micro-Desktop housing, and two types of computer cards, both using A20 dual-core ARM Cortex A7 processors.
The cards are available with four flavors of the GNU/Linux operating system, and they’re hoping to receive RYF certification from the Free Software Foundation.

“No proprietary software,” explains their campaign’s video. “No backdoors. No spyware. No NDAs.” They envision a world where users upgrade their computers by simply popping in a new card — reducing electronic waste — or print new laptop casings to repair defects or swap in different colors. (And they also hope to eventually see the cards also working with cameras, phones, tablets, and gaming consoles.) Rhombus Tech CTO Luke Leighton did a Slashdot interview in 2012, and contacted Slashdot this weekend to announce:
A live-streamed video from Hope2016 explains what it’s about, and there is a huge range of discussions and articles online. The real burning question is: if a single Software Libre Engineer can teach themselves PCB design and bring modular computing to people on the budget available from a single company, why are there not already a huge number of companies doing modular upgradeable hardware?


Share on Google+

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Clip to Evernote

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *