Minnesota Senate Votes To Bar Selling ISP Data

Kagato quotes a report from St. Paul Pioneer Press: In a surprise move, the Minnesota Senate on Wednesday voted to bar internet service providers from selling their users’ personal data without express written consent. The move was a reaction to a Tuesday vote in Congress to lift a ban on that practice imposed in 2016 by the Federal Communication Commission. Sen. Ron Latz, DFL-St. Louis Park, offered the amendment onto the Senate’s economic development budget bill, saying it was urgently needed to protect Minnesotans’ privacy after the congressional vote. Latz’s amendment was challenged under Senate rules on the grounds that it would impose a cost on a state agency and thus needed to go through committee rather than be added on the floor. Republican Sen. Warren Limmer, of Maple Grove, broke with his party to overturn the Senate president’s ruling and allow the internet privacy amendment to continue by a single vote. Once the amendment cleared this procedural hurdle, it was overwhelmingly added to the bill on a 66-1 vote. The lone critic, Sen. David Osmek, R-Mound, said Latz’s amendment needed more study and review before being adopted.
The Register reports that Illinois has also fought back against Tuesday’s vote by approving two new privacy measures. “On Thursday, the state’s Cybersecurity, Data Analytics and IT Committee approved two new privacy measures,” reports The Register. “One would allow state residents to demand what data companies such as Comcast, Verizon, Google and Facebook is sharing about them. The other would require consent before an app can track users’ locations.”


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