Maybe There’s No Life in Space Because We’re Too Early

Long-time Slashdot reader sehlat shares “a highly accessible summary” of a new theory about why we haven’t yet find life on other planets — that “we’re not latecomers, but very, very early.” From Lab News:

The universe is 13.8 billion years old, with Earth forming less than five billion years ago. One school of thought among scientists is that there is life billions of years older than us in space. But this recent study in the Journal of Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics argues otherwise… “We find that the chance of life grows much higher in the distant future…”

Stars larger than approximately three times the Sun’s mass will perish before life has a chance to evolve… The smallest stars weigh less than a tenth as much as the sun and will glow for 10 trillion years, meaning life has lot of time to begin on those planets orbiting them in the ‘habitable zone’. The probability of life increases over time so the chance of life is many times higher in the distant future than now.

The paper ultimately concludes that life “is most likely to exist near 0.1 solar-mass stars ten trillion years from now.”


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