Lost Winston Churchill Essay Reveals His Thoughts On Alien Life

“A newly discovered essay by Winston Churchill shows that the British statesman gave a lot of thought to the existential question that has inspired years of scientific research and blockbuster movies: are we alone in the University?” reports The Verge. “The essay was drafted in the 1930s, but unearthed in a museum in Missouri last year.” Astrophysicist Mario Livio was the first scientist to analyze the article and has published his comments in the journal Nature. The Verge reports: Livio was “stunned” when he first saw the unpublished, 11-page essay on the existence of alien life, he tells The Verge. The astrophysicist was visiting Westminster College in Fulton, Missouri, for a talk last year, when he was approached by Timothy Riley, the director of Fulton’s US National Churchill Museum. Riley showed him the essay, titled “Are We Alone in the Universe?” In the essay, Churchill reasons that we can’t possibly be alone in the Universe — and that many other Suns will likely have many other planets that could harbor life. Because of how enormously distant these extrasolar planets are, we may never know if they “house living creatures, or even plants,” Churchill concludes. He wrote this decades before exoplanets were discovered in the 1990s; hundreds have since been detected. What’s impressive about the essay is the way Churchill approaches the existential and scientific question of whether life exists on other planets, Livio says. Churchill’s reasoning mirrors extremely well the way scientists think about this problem today. The British leader also talks about several theories that still guide the search for alien life, Livio says. For example, he notes that water is the key ingredient for life on Earth, and so finding water on other planets could mean finding life there. Churchill also notes that life can only survive in regions “between a few degrees of frost and the boiling point of water” — what today we call the habitable zone, the region around a star that is neither too hot or too cold, so that liquid water may exist on the planet’s surface.


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