Local Canadian Police Station Admits To Owning Stingray Surveillance Device

The Edmonton Police Service has admitted to Motherboard that it owns a Stingray and that it used the [surveillance] device in the past during investigations. After Vancouver cops admitted to using the phone tracker to investigate an abduction in 2007, Motherboard called up other local police stations in Canada to ask if they had also previously used one. As you can imagine, the other stations kept mum. In the US, Stingrays are a regular part of government and law enforcement agencies’ surveillance arsenal. But Vancouver’s and Edmonton’s police services are the first law enforcement offices in Canada to confirm that they’ve used the device. Motherboard adds: According an emailed statement from police spokesperson Anna Batchelor, Edmonton’s cops have “used the device in the past during investigations,” but would not release any additional details in order to “to protect [Edmonton Police Service] operations.” Until now, the only law enforcement in the country known to use the devices was the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, the country’s analogue to the US Federal Bureau of Investigation. These suitcase-sized surveillance tools have been used in the past by the Vancouver and Toronto police, but the Vancouver police have said they borrowed the Stingray from the RCMP, and in Toronto an RCMP technician was on hand, at least in that incident. The Edmonton police’s comment to Motherboard is the first time a local police department in Canada has publicly admitted to owning a Stingray device.


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