Let’s Encrypt Criticized Over Speedy HTTPS Certifications

100 million HTTPS certificates were issued in the last year by Let’s Encrypt — a free certificate authority founded by Mozilla, Cisco and the Electronic Frontier Foundation — and they’re now issuing more than 100,000 HTTPS certificates every day. Should they be performing more vetting? msm1267 shared this article from Kaspersky Lab’s ThreatPost blog:
[S]ome critics are sounding alarm bells and warning that Let’s Encrypt might be guilty of going too far, too fast, and delivering too much of a good thing without the right checks and balances in place. The primary concern has been that while the growth of SSL/TLS encryption is a positive trend, it also offers criminals an easy way to facilitate website spoofing, server impersonation, man-in-the-middle attacks, and a way to sneak malware through company firewalls… Critics do not contend Let’s Encrypt is responsible for these types of abuses. Rather, because it is the 800-pound gorilla when it comes to issuing basic domain validation certificates, critics believe Let’s Encrypt could do a better job vetting applicants to weed out bad actors… “I think there should be some type of vetting process. That would make it more difficult for malicious actors to get them,” said Justin Jett, director of audit and compliance at Plixer, a network traffic analytics firm…

Josh Aas, executive director of the Internet Security Research Group, the organization that oversees Let’s Encrypt, points out that its role is not to police the internet, rather its mission is to make communications secure. He added that, unlike commercial certificate authorities, it keeps a searchable public database of every single domain it issues. “When people get surprised at the number of PayPal phishing sites and get worked up about it, the reason they know about it is because we allow anyone to search our records,” he said. Many other certificate authorities keep their databases of issued certificates private, citing competitive reasons and that customers don’t want to broadcast the names of their servers… The reason people treat us like a punching bag is that we are big and we are transparent. ”

The criticism intensified after Let’s Encrypt announced they’d soon offer wildcard certificates for subdomains. But the article also cites security researcher Scott Helme, who “argued if encryption is to be available to all then that includes the small percent of bad actors. ‘I don’t think it’s for Signal, or Let’s Encrypt, to decide who should have access to encryption.”


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