Large Source Of Hydrogen Gas May Lie Near Slow-Spreading Tectonic Plates Under The Ocean

New submitter pyroclast writes: According to research from Duke University, rocks forming from fast-spreading tectonic plates create hydrogen gas in large quantities. The tectonic alternation of hydrolyzed ultramafic rock to serpentinized rock has the byproduct of hydrogen gas. Science Daily reports: “‘A major benefit of this work is that it provides a testable, tectonic-based model for not only identifying where free hydrogen gas may be forming beneath the seafloor, but also at what rate, and what the total scale of this formation may be, which on a global basis is massive,’ said [researcher] Lincoln F. Pratson[.] ‘Most scientists previously thought all hydrogen production occurs only at slow-spreading lithosphere, because this is where most serpentinized rocks are found. Although faster-spreading lithosphere contains smaller quantities of this rock, our analysis suggests the amount of H2 produced there might still be large,’ [researcher Stacy] Worman said. [S]cientists need to understand where the gas goes after it’s produced. ‘Maybe microbes are eating it, or maybe it’s accumulating in reservoirs under the seafloor. We still don’t know,’ Worman said. ‘Of course, such accumulations would have to be quite significant to make hydrogen gas produced by serpentinization a viable fuel source.'”


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