Judge Rules That Government Can Force Glassdoor To Unmask Anonymous Users Online

pogopop77 shares a report from Ars Technica: An appeals court will soon decide whether the U.S. government can unmask anonymous users of Glassdoor — and the entire proceeding is set to happen in secret. Federal investigators sent a subpoena asking for the identities of more than 100 anonymous users of the business-review site Glassdoor, who apparently posted reviews of a company that’s under investigation for potential fraud related to its contracting practices. The government later scaled back its demand to just eight users. Prosecutors believe these eight Glassdoor users are “third-party witnesses to certain business practices relevant to [the] investigation.” The name of the company under investigation is redacted from all public briefs. Glassdoor made a compromise proposal to the government: it would notify the users in question about the government’s subpoena and then provide identifying information about users who were willing to participate. The government rejected that idea. At that point, Glassdoor lawyered up and headed to court, seeking to have the subpoena thrown out. Lawyers for Glassdoor argued that its users have a First Amendment right to speak anonymously. While the company has “no desire to interfere” with the investigation, if its users were forcibly identified, the investigation “could have a chilling effect on both Glassdoor’s reviewers’ and readers’ willingness to use glassdoor.com,” states Glassdoor’s motion (PDF). The government opposed the motion, though, and prevailed in district court.


Share on Google+

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Clip to Evernote

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *