Judge: eBay Can’t Be Sued Over Seller Accused of Patent Infringement

An anonymous reader quotes a report from Ars Technica: It’s game over for an Alabama man who claims his patent on “Carpenter Bee Traps” is being infringed by competing products on eBay. Robert Blazer filed his lawsuit in 2015, saying that his U.S. Patent No. 8,375,624 was being infringed by a variety of products being sold on eBay. Blazer believed the online sales platform should have to pay him damages for infringing his patent. A patent can be infringed when someone sells or “offers to sell” a patented invention. At first, Blazer went through eBay’s official channels for reporting infringement, filing a “Notice of Claimed Infringement,” or NOCI. At that point, his patent hadn’t even been issued yet and was still a pending application, so eBay told him to get back in touch if his patent was granted. On February 19, 2013, Blazer got his patent and ultimately sent multiple NOCI forms to eBay. However, eBay wouldn’t take down any items, in keeping with its policy of responding to court orders of infringement and not mere allegations of infringement. In 2015, Blazer sued, saying that eBay had directly infringed his patent and also “induced” others to infringe. That lawsuit can’t move forward, following an opinion (PDF) published this week by U.S. District Judge Karon Bowdre. The judge found that eBay lacked any knowledge of actual infringement and rejected Blazer’s argument that eBay was “willfully blind” to infringement of Blazer’s patent. The opinion was first reported yesterday by The Recorder (registration required).


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