Is Homeland Security’s Face-Scanning At Airports An Unreasonable Search?

schwit1 shares an article from MIT’s Technology Review:
Facial-recognition systems may indeed speed up the boarding process, as the airlines rolling them out promise. But the real reason they are cropping up in U.S. airports is that the government wants to keep better track of who is leaving the country, by scanning travelers’ faces and verifying those scans against photos it already has on file… The U.S. Department of Homeland Security has partnered with airlines including JetBlue and Delta to introduce such recognition systems at New York’s JFK International Airport, Washington’s Dulles International, and airports in Atlanta, Boston, and Houston, among others. It plans to add more this summer…

As facial-recognition technology has improved significantly in recent years, it has attracted the interest of governments and law enforcement agencies. That’s led to debates over whether certain uses of the technology violate constitutional protections against unreasonable searches… Harrison Rudolph, a law fellow at Georgetown Law’s Center on Privacy and Technology, and others are raising alarms because as part of the process, U.S. Customs and Border Protection is also scanning the faces of U.S. citizens… They say Congress has never expressly authorized the collection of facial scans from U.S. citizens at the border routinely and without suspicion.

“We aren’t entirely sure what the government is doing with the images,” the article adds, though it notes that the Department of Homeland Security is saying that it deletes all data pertaining to the images after two weeks. But Slashdot reader schwit1 is still worried about the possibility of an irretrievable loss of privacy, writing that “If the DHS database gets hacked, it’s hard to get a new face.”


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