How Tilt Went From Hot $375 Million Startup To Fire Sale

tedlistens writes: Not long ago, social payments company Tilt seemed to have it all — a hot idea; cool, young founders with Y Combinator pedigrees; and $67 million in funding — not to mention a $375 million valuation. But Tilt was more successful at cultivating its user growth and fun, frat-tastic office culture than at nailing down a viable business model. When Tilt finally ran out of cash, the party ended with the company’s sale at fire-sale prices to fellow Y Combinator alums Airbnb in an aqui-hire deal. Where did it all go wrong? Here’s an excerpt from the report: “Tilt was based on the premise that ‘something like PayPal and Facebook would collide,’ Tilt founder and CEO James Beshara says. The company aspired to be a social network for money — instead of sharing photos and videos, users exchanged digital cash for birthday ragers and beer runs. During Tilt’s early years, the pitch was simple, and carefully calibrated for Silicon Valley boardrooms: ‘Let’s prove that we can dominate the globe.’ […] By early 2013, millions in venture dollars were pouring into Tilt’s coffers. Investors were lured by the same strong social metrics (viral coefficient, for example, a measure of user growth) that had marked Facebook as a winner. But the hopes embedded in Tilt’s $375 million valuation came crashing down to earth last year. Beshara hadn’t built a business; instead, he had manufactured a classic Silicon Valley mirage. While investors were throwing millions of dollars at the promise of a glittering business involving ‘social’ and ‘money,’ their Mark Zuckerberg-in-the-making was basking in the sunny glow of Bay Area praise and enjoying the ride with his bros. Revenue was not a top priority — a remarkable oversight for any company, and a particularly galling one for a payments company. Eventually, with cash running low, Tilt went looking for a buyer…”


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