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HackerRank Tries To Calculate Which US States Have The Best Developers

An anonymous reader writes:
Palo Alto-based HackerRank, which offers online programmng challenges, “dug into our data of about 450,000 unique U.S. developers to uncover which states are home to the best software engineers, and which pockets of the country have the highest rate of developer growth.” Examining the 24 months from 2015 through the end of 2016, they calculated the average score for each state in eight programming-related domains. (Algorithms, data structures, functional programming, math, Java, Ruby, C++, and Python.) But it seems like low-population states would have fewer people taking the tests, meaning a disproportionate number of motivated and knowledgeable test takers could drastically skew the results. Sure enough, Wyoming — with a population of just 584,153 — has the smallest population of any U.S. state, but the site’s second-highest average score, and the top score in three subject domains — Ruby, data structures, and algorithms. And the District of Columbia — population 681,170 — has the highest average score for functional programming.

California, New York and Virginia still had the highest number of developers using the site, while Alaska, Wyoming and South Dakota not surprisingly had the least number of developers. But maybe the real take-away is that programmers are now becoming more distributed. HackerRank’s announcement notes that the site “found growing developer communities and skilled developers all across the country. Previously, the highest concentrations of developers did not stray far from the tech hubs in California. Hawaii, Colorado, Virginia, and Nevada demonstrated the fastest growth in terms of developer activity on the HackerRank platform…” In addition, “we’ve had a noticeable uptick in customers across industries, from healthcare to retail and finance, with strong demand for identifying technical skills quickly.”

Their conclucion? “Today, as the demand for developers goes beyond technology and as there is more opportunity to work remotely, there’s a more distributed workforce of skilled developers across the nation, from the Rust Belt to the East Coast… Software developers aren’t just attached to VCs, startups or Silicon Valley anymore.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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