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Google’s ‘Project Treble’ Could Lead To Faster Android Updates

Thelasko quotes a report from Ars Technica: Ahead of Google I/O, Google has just dropped a bombshell of a blog post that promises, for real this time, that it is finally doing something about Android’s update problems. “Project Treble” is a plan to modularize the Android OS, separating the OS framework code from “vendor specific” hardware code. In theory, this change would allow for a new Android update to be flashed on a device without any involvement from the silicon vendor. Google calls it “the biggest change to the low-level system architecture of Android to date,” and it’s already live on the Google Pixel’s Android O Developer Preview. This is not a magic bullet that will solve all of Android’s update problems, however. After an update is released, Google lists three steps to creating an Android update:

1. Silicon manufacturers (Qualcomm, Samsung Exynos, etc) “modify the new release for their specific hardware” and do things like make sure drivers and power management will still work.
2. OEMs (Samsung, LG, HTC) step in and “modify the new release again as needed for their devices.” This means making sure all the hardware works, rebranding Android with a custom skin, adding OEM apps, and modifying core parts of the Android OS to add special features like (before 7.0) multi-window support.
3. Carriers add more apps, more branding, and “test and certify the new release.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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