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Google Conducted Hollywood ‘Interventions’ To Change Look of Computer Scientists

theodp writes: Most TV computer scientists are still white men,” USA Today reports. “Google wants to change that. Google is calling on Hollywood to give equal screen time to women and minorities after a new study the internet giant funded found that most computer scientists on television shows and in the movies are played by white men. The problem with the hackneyed stereotype of the socially inept, hoodie-clad white male coder? It does not inspire underrepresented groups to pursue careers in computer science, says Daraiha Greene, Google CS in Media program manager, multicultural strategy.” According to a Google-funded study conducted by Prof. Stacy L. Smith and the Media, Diversity, & Social Change Initiative at the USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism, Google’s Computer Science in Media team conducted “CS interventions” with “like-minded people” to create “Google influenced storytelling.” The executive summary for a USC study entitled Cracking the Code: The Prevalence and Nature of Computer Science Depictions in Media notes that “Google influenced” TV programs include HBO’s Silicon Valley and AMC’s Halt and Catch Fire. The USC researchers also note that “non-tech focused programs may offer prime opportunities to showcase CS in unique and counter-stereotypical ways. As the Google Team moves forward in its work with series such as Empire, Girl Meets World, Gortimer Gibbons Life on Normal Street, or The Amazing Adventures of Gumball, it appears the Team is seizing these opportunities to integrate CS into storytelling without a primary tech focus.” The study adds, “In the case of certain series, we provided on-going advisement. The Fosters, Miles from Tomorrowland, Halt and Catch Fire, Ready, Jet, Go, The Powerpuff Girls and Odd Squad are examples of this. In addition to our continuing interactions, we engaged in extensive PR and marketing support including social media outreach, events and press.” Google’s TV interventions have even spilled over into public education — one of Google-sponsored Code.org’s signature Hour of Code tutorials last December was Gumball’s Coding Adventure, inspired by the Google-advised Cartoon Network series, The Amazing Adventures of Gumball. “We need more students around the world pursuing an education in CS, particularly girls and minorities, who have historically been underrepresented in the field,” explains a Google CS First presentation for educators on the search giant’s Hour of Code partnership with Cartoon Network. “Based on our research, one of the reasons girls and underrepresented minorities are not pursuing computer science is because of the negative perception of computer scientists and the relevance of the field beyond coding.” According to a 2015 USC report, President Obama was kept abreast of efforts to challenge media’s stereotypical portrayals of women; White House Visitor Records show that USC’s Smith, the Google-funded study’s lead author, and Google CS Education in Media Program Manager Julie Ann Crommett (now at Disney) were among those present when the White House Council on Women and Girls met earlier that year with representatives of the nation’s leading toy makers, media giants, retailers, educators, scientists, the U.S. Dept. of Education, and philanthropists.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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