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Google Announces Android Cross-Licensing Program ‘PAX’ — But Why?

“Linux and open-source software have had to contend with intellectual property legal challenges for years,” writes ZDNet. “Now, Google has started a new effort to bring peace to potential Android IP sore points: PAX… a royalty-free, community-patent cross-license.”
PAX is starting with nine members: Google, Samsung Electronics, LG Electronics, HTC, Foxconn Technology Group, Coolpad, BQ, HMD Global, and Allview. These companies own more than 230,000 global patents. PAX’s purpose is to create a “community-driven [patent] clearinghouse, developed together with our Android partners, [that] ensures that innovation and consumer choice — not patent threats — will continue to be key drivers of our Android ecosystem. PAX is free to join and open to anyone.”
Slashdot reader Andy Updegroved writes:
The question is why? The announcement and the related website are extremely brief, and although everyone is invited to get a copy of the cross license, Google reserves the right to decide first whether your motives are pure and you can keep a secret. And so far, the only members of the “PAX Community” listed are existing Google business partners. Is Google aware of some new patent tempest brewing just over the horizon, about to burst into public view? And will any other company names and logos be added to the PAX Community Web page? We’ll just have to stay tuned to find out.

Andy Updegrove tells ZDNet it does involve “formal cross-licenses between participants, and therefore enforceable rights, but not an infrastructure to do more (at least insofar as one can tell from the initial announcement).”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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