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GitHub Now Lets Its Workers Keep the IP When They Use Company Resources For Personal Projects

If it’s on company time, it’s the company’s dime. That’s the usual rule in the tech industry — that if employees use company resources to work on projects unrelated to their jobs, their employer can claim ownership of any intellectual property (IP) they create. But GitHub is throwing that out the window. From a report on Quartz: Today the code-sharing platform announced a new policy, the Balanced Employee IP Agreement (BEIPA). This allows its employees to use company equipment to work on personal projects in their free time, which can occur during work hours, without fear of being sued for the IP. As long as the work isn’t related to GitHub’s own “existing or prospective” products and services, the employee owns it. Like all things related to tech IP, employee agreements are a contentious issue. In some US states, it’s not uncommon for contracts to give companies full ownership of all work employees produce during their tenure, and sometimes even before and after their tenure, regardless of when or how they produce it. These restrictions have led to several horror stories, like the case of Alcatel vs. Evan Brown.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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