GhostMail Closes in September, Leaves Users Searching For Secure Email Alternatives

On September 1, “GhostMail will no longer provide secure email services unless you are an enterprise client,” reports ZDNet. “According to the company, it is ‘simply not worth the risk.'” GhostMail provided a free and anonymous “military encrypted” e-mail service based in Switzerland, and collected “as little metadata” as possible. But this week on its home page, GhostMail told its users “Since we started our project, the world has changed for the worse and we do not want to take the risk of supplying our extremely secure service to the wrong people… In general, we believe strongly in the right to privacy, but we have taken a strategic decision to only supply our platform and services to the enterprise segment.”

GhostMail is referring their users to other free services like Protonmail as an alternative, but an anonymous Slashdot reader asks: What options does an average person have for non-NSA-spied-on email? I am sure there are still some Ghostmail competitors out there but I’m wondering if it’s better to coax friends and family to use encryption within their given client (Gmail, Yahoo, Outlook, whatever…) And are there any options for hosting a “private” email service: inviting friends and family to use it and have it kind of hosted locally. Ghostmail-in-a-box or some such?


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