EFF Accuses T-Mobile of Violating Net Neutrality With Throttled Video

An anonymous reader writes: T-Mobile’s new “unlimited” data plan that throttles video has upset the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), which accuses the company of violating net neutrality principles. The new $70-per-month unlimited data plan “limits video to about 480p resolution and requires customers to pay an extra $25 per month for high-definition video,” reports Ars Technica. “Going forward, this will be the only plan offered to new T-Mobile customers, though existing subscribers can keep their current prices and data allotments.” EFF Senior Staff Technologist Jeremy Gillula told the Daily Dot, “From what we’ve read thus far it seems like T-Mobile’s new plan to charge its customers extra to not throttle video runs directly afoul of the principle of net neutrality.” The FCC’s net neutrality rules ban throttling, though Ars notes “there’s a difference between violating ‘the principle of net neutrality’ and violating the FCC’s specific rules, which have exceptions to the throttling ban and allow for case-by-case judgements.” “Because our no-throttling rule addresses instances in which a broadband provider targets particular content, applications, services, or non-harmful devices, it does not address a practice of slowing down an end user’s connection to the internet based on a choice made by the end user,” says the FCC’s Open Internet Order (PDF). “For instance, a broadband provider may offer a data plan in which a subscriber receives a set amount of data at one speed tier and any remaining data at a lower tier.” The EFF is still determining whether or not to file a complaint with the Federal Communications Commission.


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