Does Silicon Valley Need More Labor Unions?

Salon recently talked to Jeffrey Buchanan, who two years ago co-founded a labor rights group “that highlights the plight of security officers, food-service workers, janitors and shuttle-bus drivers in the region.” An anonymous reader quotes their report:
The situation among Silicon Valley’s low-wage contract workers has become so perilous that in January, thousands of security guards working at immensely profitable companies like Facebook and Cisco followed the shuttle-bus drivers and voted to unionize in an effort to collectively bargain for higher wages and better benefits. The upcoming labor contract negotiations between the roughly 3,000 security guards (represented by SEIU United Service Workers West) and their employers is one of the biggest developments in Silicon Valley labor organizing to happen this year. Buchanan says there’s also a broader push this year to get tech companies to be proactive in ensuring these workers can make ends meet, even if these companies have to pay more for the services they procure…

A paper published last year by University of California at Santa Cruz researchers Chris Brenner and Kyle Neering estimates between 19,000 and 39,000 contracted service workers are employed in the Valley at any given time… An additional 78,000 workers are at risk of becoming contract employees, according to the study, a number which includes administrative assistants, sales representatives and medium-wage computer programmers. This is part of a larger societal shift in which salaried workers are converted to contractors — a transition that benefits business owners, in that they don’t have to pay benefits and can hire and fire contractors at will.
Buchanan’s group represents contractors typically earning “as little as $20,000 a year.” But Salon’s headline argues that “programmers may be next” in the drive to organize contractors.


Share on Google+

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Clip to Evernote

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *