Apple is About To Do Something Their Programmers Definitely Don’t Want

Last week, The Wall Street Journal had a big feature on Apple Campus, the big new beautiful office the company has spent north of $5 billion on. The profile, in which the reporter interviewed Apple’s design chief Jony Ive, also mentioned about an open space where all the programmers would sit and work. Ever since the profile came out, several people have expressed their concerns about the work environment for the developers. American entrepreneur and technologist Anil Dash writes: […] There have been countless academic studies confirming the same result: Workers in open plan offices are frustrated, distracted and generally unhappy. That’s not to say there’s no place for open plan in an offices — there can be great opportunities to collaborate and connect. For teams like marketing or communications or sales, sharing a space might make a lot of sense. But for tasks that require being in a state of flow? The science is settled. The answer is clear. The door is closed on the subject. Or, well, it would be. If workers had a door to close. Now, when it comes to jobs or roles that need to be in a state of flow, programming may be the single best example of a task that benefits from not being interrupted. And Apple has some of the best coders in the world, so it’s just common sense that they should be given a great environment. That’s why it was particularly jarring to see this side note in the WSJ’s glowing article about Apple’s new headquarters: “Coders and programmers are concerned their work surroundings will be too noisy and distracting.” Usually, companies justify putting programmers into an open office plan for budget reasons. It does cost more to make enough room for every coder to have an office with a door that closes. But given that Apple’s already invested $5 billion into this new campus, complete with iPhone-influenced custom-built toilets for the space, it’s hard to believe this decision was about penny-pinching. The other possible argument for skipping private offices would be if a company didn’t know that’s what its workers would prefer.


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