Android Wear 2.0 Is An Evolutionary Update To Google’s Smartwatch OS

Google is officially launching Android Wear 2.0 today — the biggest update to the company’s wearable operating system since its launch in 2014. While Android Wear 2.0 will be launching with two new flagship watches from LG — the LG Watch Sport and LG Watch Style, a number of existing Wear watches will also get this update in the coming weeks and months. TechCrunch reports: The first thing you’ll notice when you get a 2.0 watch is the overall update to its design — both in terms of the overall look but also the user experience. The look of Wear 2.0 now skews closer to Google’s Material Design guidelines. While the overall look will still feel familiar to Wear 1.0 users, the update put a stronger emphasis on cards, for example. This means every notification now gets a full screen to show its preview and you can use the watch’s dial to scroll through them (assuming your watch has a dial, of course — otherwise you can obviously still use the touch screen to scroll). The other marquee feature of Wear 2.0 is support for standalone apps that don’t need a companion app to run on your phone. That means developers can write apps that are purely geared toward the watch and they can then publish it on the Google Play store, which is now also available directly on the watch. That sounds more useful than it is — unless you plan on getting an LTE-enabled watch and leave your phone at home. That’s an option now that you could run Hangout or Google Music directly on the watch, but, except for runners, that’s likely not a typical use case. At the end of the day, the most important use case for a smartwatch remains dealing with notifications. Everything else often feels like an unnecessary complication. [In summary, Frederic Lardinois writes via TechCrunch:] The Android smartwatch market could use a revolution to kickstart what now occasionally feels like a moribund ecosystem. Wear 2.0 doesn’t feel revolutionary. It is, however, a perfectly adequate update that addresses many of the issues with Android Wear. It also puts it on parity with its competitors, like Apple’s watchOS or Samsung’s Tizen. It does also introduce some new use cases for LTE-enabled watches, but I can’t help but feel that this will remain a niche category. Much, however, will depend on Google’s hardware partners who will now have to bring Wear 2.0 to life.


Share on Google+

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Clip to Evernote

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *