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A Powerful Solar Storm Is Bringing Hazards and Rare Auroras Our Way

tedlistens shares a report from Fast Company: The Space Weather Prediction Center has upgraded a geomagnetic storm watch for September 6 and 7 to a level only occasionally seen, but scientists say it’s nothing to be too alarmed about. They do recommend looking for an unusual display of the aurora — the northern lights caused by a disturbance of the magnetosphere — in areas of the U.S. not used to seeing them: “really in the upper tier of the United States,” says Robert Rutledge, lead of operations at the center, which is part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The storm could pose an “elevated radiation risk to passengers and crew in high-flying aircraft at far north or south latitudes,” a NOAA warning says, and intermittently impact high frequency RF communications, which may require some transpolar flight routes to divert to lower geomagnetic latitudes (a shift that would cost the airlines more). There’s a slim chance of isolated interfere with high-precision GPS readings, but those issues usually only tend to arise with stronger storms. The so-called G3 level storm is the result of what’s called a coronal mass ejection, where magnetic interactions on the sun launch part of its outer atmosphere of superheated plasma into space. When that burst of radiation gets near earth — barreling toward us at a million miles per hour, it takes about two days to make the journey — its magnetic field interacts with Earth’s, Rutledge says. Northern U.S. and Canadian residents hoping to catch a glimpse of the aurora will get their best shot on Wednesday night and early Thursday, and the Space Weather Prediction Center posts 30-minute forecasts of the colorful sky phenomenon’s intensity.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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